Simplicity 8292


Simplicity 8292 pattern review


Whenever I go to the Knitting and Stitching Shows I get drawn in by M Rosenberg and Son's stall - there's so much on there that sparks inspiration. This was one of those fabrics (yes, even though it is basically, grey); I immediately knew it would be great for a shift dress for work. It took me a while to decide on a pattern, but this one is a really good one for creating some wardrobe basics.


Fabric

This is a suiting fabric that I bought at the Alexandra Palace Knitting and Stitching show last autumn. I think it was around £10 a metre and was told that it has a wool composition. It also has some small degree of stretch in there which I appreciate whilst wearing the dress! I bought 2 metres, but used less than 1.5m on this dress so will use the left overs in a contrast dress some other time. It behaved very well whilst it was being sewn and does whilst being worn as well - we all know how much I hate creasing!

I had grey lining to hand from a previous make and very little was needed, but it does make a huge difference to how the dress feels on.

Simplicity 8292

Pattern and Instructions

For this dress I used the Simplicity 8292 pattern. It's a standard 'big 4' pattern and there are two different sizes that you can buy. I'm right at the top of the sizing range on this one, FYI. I used the base of the Variation D dress, and some of the instructions for the sleeveless element of variation A. I know that patterns are designed with different armholes for sleeveless and sleeved variations, but I figured that the princess seaming would allow me some leeway to draw in the armhole if needed. I didn't pull it in for this version, but it would be something that might be needed with different fabrics.

I made the size 14 for this version because I wanted a little more ease and comfort than my previous make, which was more of an occasion dress. My measurements align with the 12, but the 14 is much more practical for work purposes and I probably would go with this in future anyway for versions C & D. For the flared skirt I might go back down to a 12. The princess seamed bodice might seem like a complicated step but it is all actually very easy to sew together. The bodice is lined as well, which is a very worthwhile step. It might seem like it would take longer to make another bodice, but what it does do is mean that you don't have to finish all the inner seams here so it evens out. I didn't line the skirt, as per the pattern (can always add it in later if needed). I found this a very easy pattern to put together, even the back vent in the skirt is simple to construct. As a result it only took a day to sew. It would be a good pattern for an adventurous beginner because it really is a case of matching up seams and sewing away -  I think it looks more complicated than it really is.
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Hi, I'm Laura. Welcome to my journeys with modern, feminine dressmaking; pattern reviews, tips and guides for beginners. I'm a lifelong foodie, so you'll also find some delicious recipes and places to get that foodie fix.
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